by Alyse Price-Tobler (mcap)

                                      SEMPI Social Communication Model©            

              © 2018 Alyse Price-Tobler () Music by Tania Rose
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SEMPI Version 2 is released!

Posted on May 6, 2018 at 10:35 PM Comments comments (1)

Media release for the Sempi Social Communication Model version 2. By Alyse Price-Tobler 6.5.2018

 

New System takes mental health conversations beyond ‘Are You Ok?’

 

What is the ‘SSCM’ and why was it designed?

 

This model offers a new way to move conversations around mental and physical health beyond, ‘Are You OK?’ The ‘SEMPI Social Communication Model’ offers a deeper, more real invitation, asked by one person to another, (between ages three to adult), questions that come from a genuine place of interest for another person, from the acronym ‘SEMPI’, that is available for all community members through a free community resource booklet.

 

SEMPI teaches community members the steps to take if someone is not OK in that very moment. The ‘SSCM’ teaches adult community members how to easily move into deeper, more empathetic conversations, enabling everyone to feel heard & understood, through the acronym known as SEMPI. Each letter within the acronym SEMPI covers all aspects of daily mental and physical health in an easy to use system.

 

It is suggested that the question ‘HOW IS YOUR SEMPI?’ is offered as an alternative question to ‘Are You O.K?’

 

Introducing the question, ‘HOW IS YOUR SEMPI?'

 

'HOW IS YOUR SEMPI?' is a deeper, more real invitation, asked by one person to another, (between ages three to adult). This question is asked if it comes from a genuine place of interest for another person.

 

‘HOW IS YOUR SEMPI?’ comes with an in built offer to take the time out to listen, and walk with the other person, consequently moving the conversation to a deeper level of empathy, care and understanding for each other’s perspectives.

 

‘HOW IS YOUR SEMPI?’ is a totally unique question that no one is used to hearing, so they cannot equate it to the question ‘ARE YOU O.K?’

 

How does this model benefit the community?

 

SEMPI can be taught in under 20 minutes. Members may experience the development of closer communal bonds, reduced loneliness and depression, heightened feelings of inclusion, and higher values of self-worth. This may have a positive impact on community member’s levels of empathy and happiness. It may also influence communal policing budgets, resources allocated to health care programs, and professional community workers burn out rates. Money saved can be used to improve communities health and wellbeing overall.

The 'SSCM' is created to be an aid for the community (not a replacement for professional help). There is a HUGE gap in the area of self-care in the community due to escalating living costs and cuts to social services. This model is created with this in mind, to assist the community to work with their difficulties together, and be able to identify them early, so that their problems don't escalate to higher unmanageable levels, and community money can be better spent.

The ‘SSCM’ is designed to work across all levels of stigma, including workplace stigma, mental health stigma, social class stigma, disability stigma and social stigma (physical, behavioural, intellectual and group). It teaches each person an easy to remember sequential task, so that they can adapt the model exactly to suit their own personal stories, and then pay it forward.

 

It is very clear, that mental and physical illness has become more prevalent in today’s society, and community resources are now at breaking point. Every day, there are extreme levels of loneliness, low self-esteem and loss of hope. There is class division, segregation, judgemental behaviour, inequality, stigma, and discrimination. The ‘SSCM’ has been designed as a preventative measure, so that we as a society, can start to empower our community members to have deeper levels of conversation, so that more of us do not become mentally or emotionally unwell, and we can combat the stigma head on from a strong standpoint.

 

Who can use the ‘SSCM?’

 

Children from age three, can use the specifically designed children’s model, to learn how to speak about and understand themselves. Children gain immediate personal insight about how their bodies and minds are feeling from an early age, thereby reducing stigma and normalising talk around mental health. Children can speak about anything they choose, be it good or not so good, in their daily routine. They can share this model with adults, or other children, allowing everyone to reciprocally have a voice and feel heard!

 

Teachers in schools can especially benefit when they teach their students SEMPI, as the students will learn a much more expressive needs vocabulary, and learn to speak up about serious issues. It can allow for the fast identification within the child of physical or mental abuse, allowing guardians to act before the child’s problem escalates.

 

This model also gives a voice to people with any disability or mental illness. I know this, because I teach this model to my clients. I originally trialled the SSCM on women experiencing primary homelessness with mental illness at The Exodus Foundation in Ashfield NSW, as my Master’s Degree thesis. I now teach members across the community this model, IN UNDER 10 MINUTES how to do this, so that they can pay it forward.

 

The ‘SSCM’ has been written for ALL community members, from all walks of life! This new model teaches everyone from aged three to adult, the art of having a heart to heart conversation, so that competing with each other stops, and real listening can take place. This model increases altruism through a ‘pay it forward’ philosophy.

 

This idea matters because people need personal equality and freedom to thrive. The silence and imbalance of power within our society needs to be stopped, so that we all feel heard, validated and understood, while honouring each other.

 

Imagine if people could learn to speak freely and honestly with a strong voice, about why they feel the way they do and what their individual needs are, while also believing that they will be heard when they do this.

 

This concept has the power to change the world!

 

The SEMPI Social Communication Model and over 40 videos about SEMPI, are available for viewing at www.sempi.net or

 

YouTube https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=sempi+social+communication+model

 

END

 

Contact

 

For further media information contact: Alyse Price-Tobler email [email protected] web www.alyseprice-tobler.com

 

My background

 

I am a professional, practicing Psychotherapist/Counsellor with a Master’s Degree in Psychotherapy and Counselling (MCAP). I currently run my own private psychotherapy practice and counselling retreat out of Mittagong in NSW. I have worked in front line Community Mental Health & Disabilities, for the past 32 years. I have walked with thousands of struggling community members and I have seen a lot! These amazing souls are the reason why I get out of bed every day. My passion is deep and I am a very driven and serious advocate for many of my clients. Giving my clients a voice to feel heard and empowered is why I have written this model. Changing the conversations across the world to be more loving and empathetic for the generations to come, has been my primary focus all of my life. Alyse :)

New SEMPI tutorials are up!!!

Posted on February 23, 2018 at 8:35 AM Comments comments (0)

UPDATE!!! aLL TUTORIALS ARE NOW UP ON https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=sempi+social+communication+model


Great News! 

The SEMPI Tutorials have started! So, if you are interested in how to really get your teeth into SEMPI< watch the tutorials!!! I have recorded 1, 2 and 3, and am about to record 4, 5 and 6!

Stay tuned! Alyse!

MEDIA RELEASE FOR THE SEMPI SOCIAL COMMUNICATION MODEL

Posted on February 21, 2018 at 10:00 AM Comments comments (0)

By Alyse Price-Tobler 22.2 18

MEDIA RELEASE FOR THE SEMPI SOCIAL COMMUNICATION MODEL

What happens if you ask someone if they're O.K, and they answer NO?

What if there was a solution?

‘Do you know how to stop what you're doing, and have a deeper, more real, empathic conversation with another person, allowing them to feel heard, validated and understood, if they answer ‘NO?’

Here is the solution!

Hi, my name is Alyse Price-Tobler (MCAP). The last four years of my life have been dedicated to designing a completely original, ground breaking, FREE stigma reduction model for the world! I can guarantee you that there is no other model like this one anywhere, and it has the power to positively change communities!

The ‘SEMPI Social Communication Model’ (pronounced Sem-pie) has been developed primarily with the purpose of reducing ''the tribal stigma of race, nation, and religion" (Goffman, 1963) within our communities. ‘The SEMPI Social Communication Model’ will be known as the ‘SSCM’ for the remainder of this media release.

What is the ‘SSCM’ and why was it designed?

SEMPI teaches community members the steps to take if someone is not OK in that very moment. The ‘SSCM’ teaches adult community members how to easily move into deeper, more empathetic conversations, enabling everyone to feel heard & understood, through the acronym known as SEMPI. Each letter within the acronym SEMPI covers all aspects of daily mental and physical health in an easy to use system. Children from age three can use the specifically designed children’s model, to learn how to speak about and understand themselves. They can also gain personal insight about how their bodies and minds are feeling from an early age, thereby reducing stigma and normalising talk around mental health. Children can speak about anything they choose, be it good or not so good, in their daily routine. They can share this model with adults, or other children, allowing everyone to reciprocally have a voice and feel heard!

The ‘SSCM’ has been written for ALL community members, from all walks of life! This new model teaches everyone from aged three to adult, the art of having a heart to heart conversation, so that competing with each other stops, and real listening can take place. This model is designed as a community aid to reduce loneliness, stigma, and bullying between community members, while increasing altruism through a ‘pay it forward’ philosophy.

This idea matters because people need personal equality and freedom to thrive. The silence and imbalance of power within our society needs to be stopped, so that we all feel heard, validated and understood, while honouring each other.

Imagine if people could learn to speak freely and honestly with a strong voice, about why they feel the way they do and what their individual needs are, while also believing that they will be heard when they do this.

This concept has the power to change the world!

Is there a better question than ‘are you alright?’ or ‘are you o.k?’

While I was writing the ‘SSCM’, I decided to include a new solution to the question ‘Are you alright?’ I created a whole new angle, and a brand new replacement question!

 

 

Introducing the question, ‘HOW IS YOUR SEMPI?'

'HOW IS YOUR SEMPI?' is a deeper, more real invitation, asked by one person to another, (between ages three to adult). This question is asked if it comes from a genuine place of interest for another person.

‘HOW IS YOUR SEMPI?’ comes with an in built offer to take the time out to listen, and walk with the other person, consequently moving the conversation to a deeper level of empathy, care and understanding for each other’s perspectives!

‘HOW IS YOUR SEMPI?’ is a totally unique question that no one is used to hearing, so they cannot equate it to the question ‘ARE YOU ALRIGHT?’

How does this model benefit the community?

Most importantly! Knowing this model could save someone’s life!

Members may also experience the development of closer communal bonds, reduced loneliness and depression, heightened feelings of inclusion, and higher values of self-worth. This may have a positive impact on community member’s levels of empathy and happiness. It may also influence communal policing budgets, resources allocated to health care programs, and professional community workers burn out rates. Money saved can be used to improve communities health and wellbeing overall.

The 'SSCM' is created to be an aid for the community (not a replacement for professional help). There is a HUGE gap in the area of self-care in the community due to escalating living costs and cuts to social services. This model is created with this in mind, to assist the community to work with their difficulties together, and be able to identify them early, so that their problems don't escalate to higher unmanageable levels, and community money can be better spent!

The ‘SSCM’ is designed to work across all levels of stigma, including workplace stigma, mental health stigma, social class stigma, disability stigma and social stigma (physical, behavioural, intellectual and group). It teaches each person an easy to remember sequential task that they can adapt the model exactly to suit their own personal stories, and then pay it forward.

Why the ‘SSCM’ is important

There is no other model like the ‘SSCM’ in the world!

It is very clear, that mental illness has become more prevalent and community resources are now at breaking point! Every day, there are extreme levels of loneliness, low self-esteem and loss of hope. There is class division, segregation, judgemental behaviour, inequality, stigma, and discrimination. The ‘SSCM’ has been designed as a preventative measure, so that we as a society, do not become mentally or emotionally unwell.

The SEMPI Social Communication Model has been released as of 22.2.2018 and available for viewing at www.sempi.net or

YouTube https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=sempi+social+communication+model

END

Contact

For further media information contact: Alyse Price-Tobler email [email protected] web www.alyseprice-tobler.com

Boiler plate:

My background

I am a professional, practising Psychotherapist/Counsellor with a Master’s Degree in Psychotherapy and Counselling (MCAP). I have worked in front line Community Mental Health & Disabilities, for the past 32 years. I have walked with thousands of struggling community members and I have seen a lot! These amazing souls are the reason why I get out of bed every day. My passion is deep and I am a very driven and serious advocate for many of my clients. Giving my clients a voice to feel heard and empowered is why I have written this model. I currently run my own private psychotherapy practise and counselling retreat out of Mittagong in NSW.

 

 

Why I created the SEMPI Social Communication Model

Posted on November 9, 2017 at 4:15 AM Comments comments (0)

Hi, and thankyou for coming to my website to spend your precious time reading my blog.

 

I wanted to say something about one of the main reasons for designing the SEMPI model. Throughout my many years as a community worker, the men and women who have been experiencing homelessness, have been among the people who have most touched my heart.

 

I cannot imagine, as much as I try, to understand what it must be like to experience unmanaged mental health issues, ongoing painful and debilitating physical symptoms, and not having anywhere safe to live. Just typing this is bringing up a lot of emotion for me. Over the years, I have worked with, and walked with, many many people experiencing this way of life. My frustration with the lack of housing and good mental health care has only deepened over time and after I finished my research at the Exodus Foundation and the absolutely amazing Bill crews and his dedicated staff, it was clear to me that I had to get the model that I had already been working on for some time, out there in the world.

 

I started to write SEMPI after a long painful operation. During my time in hospital, I found myself needing to speak to someone about what was happening to me both mentally and physically, while I was in recovery. To my surprise, there was no one on staff who were able to fill this need for me. I asked if there was a counsellor on staff, or perhaps a Nun or Brother from a local order who came through. There was nothing. When I found myself crying and trying to process the huge event that I had just been through, I was met with staff who were showing signs of concern and worry for me about my mental health, and obvious frustration at my putting them out of their routine with my 'upsetness'. At one point, the Nurse Unit Manager was called in, along with two other nurses, who questioned me about why I was really upset and if I was suicidal. I actually didn't think I was crying more than anyone else would have done in my position at the time and didn't really warrant being asked if I was suicidel.  Actually, I silently cried three times in four days, but not weeping and deep crying. I couldn't believe that my crying and asking if someone could come and talk to me had evoked this response. I knew instantly that I was not going to get any help from the nursing staff and that no one else was coming to speak to me about what I was going through around my adjustment after my operation, at anytime soon. I experienced first hand stigma from staff who were working in a large institution and questioning my mental health because I was crying after a six hour operation. I had to do something. I wondered how people who did have serious mental health issues were treated in these settings. Then I wondered about what it must be like for men and women who were homeless as well and how they are treated. I wanted to write a model that  everyone could learn, so that the staff would no longer be scared of anyone showing any emotion and or who were taking up their time. I imagined lay people coming in to hospitals and teaching people the SEMPI language, while settling them down and giving them a voice. 

 

SEMPI WAS BORN

 

This was the moment that I started to design a model for anyone needing to speak to someone and feel heard when they are going through a difficult time. I decided to write a model that was easy to pick up, was altruistic, needed to be able to be along the same lines as the 'pay it forward', could be used by children and adults, as well as anyone in those two categories that have a disability or mental health issue.

 

My model needed to be used by basically everybody.

 

The most important factor was that it needed to be FREE so that it can get out to the people who need it the most.

 

It can be used from anyone aged from three to 110, from any profession, seven days per week.

It needed to reduce loneliness and isloation.

 

This is my passion. This is my biggest project. This is for the homeless men and women that have taught me and trusted me. This is for my children and the coming generations, so that they do not experience the levels of stigma around mental health that are currently ingrained in our society. Children are our future. Children who have a voice and are taught to use it are empowered little people who grow up to be powerful emotionally intelligent adults. My SEMPI model attempts to do this.


Thank you for reading, Alyse :)

#homeless, #women, #public, #self-esteem, #stigma, #empathy, #mentalhealth #hospital #childmentalhealth #adultmentalhealth


Results from my Master's degree research thesis on women experiencing homelessness in Sydney, Australia 2017

Posted on November 9, 2017 at 3:25 AM Comments comments (0)

Research Project by Alyse Price-Tobler September 2016

Investigate the Varied Responses from the Female Primary Homeless as Evident in Demonstrations from the General Public

 

Part One

Research Thesis

The research thesis has focussed on ‘investigating the varied responses from the female primary homeless as evident in demonstrations from the general public’.

Abstract.

This research proposes to investigate the link between the experiences of homeless women and how stigma affects their self-esteem, by identifying the theoretical tension that exists within the stigma literature and comparing it to the results from the data collected from female respondents attending The Exodus Foundation, founded by Reverend Bill Crews in Ashfield, NSW. Stigma is identified as one of the main organising principles for this study.

Method.

Six respondents who are experiencing or have experienced ‘primary homelessness’ were recruited. Face to face semi structured open ended interviews, recording of transcripts of conversations and notes were taken. Respondents were asked about their experiences of ‘direct contact’ with the public, their levels of self-esteem and any counselling they may have received. Subthemes emerging from the coded data were subsequently analysed.

Results.

Results showed that when the respondents were asked about their experience with the public, ‘positive direct contact’ elicited the highest amount of data with 19 references, followed by ‘negative direct contact,’ with 17 direct references, and thirdly, ‘indifferent direct contact’ eliciting 10 references. Sub theme two arose when the respondents were asked about their ‘perceptions’ of the public toward them, with a definite skew toward being negative. Data showed that ‘perceived no contact’ references were recorded at 17, with ‘perceived positive’ references recorded at 9 and ‘perceived undecided’ references at 10. Self-esteem results showed the women ranged from 0-2/10 while still homeless and rising to 2-6/10 when placed in housing. Currently only one woman is receiving counselling out of six. Further results reported 49 separate health concerns between only three of the women and results for counselling showed that three of the women have previously received short term trauma counselling after a serious event. Finally, the major stigma literature identified for comparison against this study did not show a similar result from data collected in all three examples.

Conclusion.

The data reveals that the respondents’ self-esteem is relatively high when it comes to the publics ‘direct contact’ attitudes toward them, as long as the women operate under the general societal rules. This data coincides with lower levels of stigma being interpreted by the women from the public. However, when the women are alone and don’t have the publics validation, their self-esteem drops due to overwhelming thoughts about their circumstances, and their health problems, leaving them with no resilience to consider professional counselling. The study shows that due to the daily difficulties that the women face, including: a negatively ‘perceived’ view of themselves when not experiencing ‘positive direct contact,’ and numerous health and housing problems, the women continue to suffer low self-esteem overall. Sub theme data results identified a negative relationship of ‘direct contact’ stigma with the Police. The researcher hypothesises that this finding may be contributing to the women’s low self-esteem, while becoming counterproductive toward the positive contact the women receive from the public.

Key words: #homeless, #women, #public, #self-esteem, #stigma, #empathy, #mentalhealth.

In this study, the qualitative approach known as grounded theory (Strauss & Corbin, 1998) has been employed to observe and record varied responses through interviews with the ‘primary homeless women’ regarding demonstrations from the general public toward them (Gerdes & Segal, 2011). Primary homelessness is defined by the ‘Australian Bureau of Statistics’ (2011, p.1) as, “people without conventional accommodation (living in the streets, in deserted buildings, improvised dwellings, under bridges, in parks, etc).” This can also be known as ‘sleeping rough.’ According to the Australian Bureau of Statistics, there are currently 105,237 people in Australia who are homeless. 2,315 people are ‘sleeping rough’, in tents or improvised dwellings (Homelessness Statistics, 2012). The United Nations reported that there are up to one hundred million homeless people across the world. Homeless people experience high mortality rates experienced through many differing methods, generally through suicide and the practise self-harm. Homelessness is identified a “critical social problem and one that is increasing in breadth, depth, and complexity” (Mowbray & Bybee, 1998, p. 172).

The purpose of this paper is to present the results from the research into the development of a theory of stigmatisation among the homeless female population attending ‘The Exodus Foundation’ in Ashfield NSW. This is in light of any pre-existing studies on homelessness and how it connects to stigma. The general research question answered within this study is, “Do women facing homelessness experience social stigma from the general public and does it affect their self-esteem?

Thanks for reading, Alyse :)

 

One reason that SEMPI was developed

Posted on November 9, 2017 at 3:20 AM Comments comments (0)

The Sempi Social Communication Model is designed to help humankind feel equal through the reduction of stigma. It does not care about your age, race or social status. It will be free for everyone so that we can all walk together. Alyse ������������❤

Alyse Tobler

#reducementalhealthstigma

#reducestigma

#payitforward

#sharethelove

#childrensmentalhealth

I had an idea!

Posted on October 27, 2017 at 2:10 AM Comments comments (0)

Hi everyone!

 

I had an idea. It was a big idea.

I wanted to design a social communication model to address loneliness and communication barriers.

I wanted the model to be for children and adults.

I wanted the model to respond to loneliness and give people a voice to feel heard.

I wanted the model to be altruistic with philanthropic principles.

I wanted the model to teach and promote empathy to communities at a grass roots level.

I wanted it to be FREE.

 

I wanted a lot and I’ll tell you why.

 

My story

 

After 32 years of working in the community with people with disabilities and mental health issues it became very clear to me, that life in the community was getting harder, mental illness was becoming more prevalent and community resources were stretched to the limit. Basically, the task was looking bleak.

 

Why I created the model

 

Every day I saw extreme levels of loneliness, low self esteem and loss of hope. I saw class division, segregation, judgemental behaviours, inequality, stigma and discrimination. I saw very little integration or acceptance even in recent times with social media. My heart broke for the lack of a positive future that I saw for so many of my clients. I was frustrated about the lack of empathy shown to the people that I worked with, and consequently, for my Masters thesis, I studied women who were experiencing primary homelessness, as well as both mental and physical health issues, and how they viewed stigma.

I decided to do something more for these women and my clients than just data collection. Surely there must be some way to design a model empowering people to come together, from all walks of life, so that everyone can feel heard and understood. Couldn’t promoting greater empathy help to heal our communities?

 

How about an easy way of communicating for everyone? How about making it free so that it is available to anyone who needs it, day or night, weekdays and weekends.

 

Why the world needs SEMPI

 

Previously, we as a society have been taught the skills to identify and implement precautions so that we won’t become physically sick, but as a society we have not been taught how to prevent becoming mentally or emotionally unwell. Nor have we been taught how to look after our beautiful minds very well.

 

We all have mental health and are faced with challenges from early childhood which include bullying, peer group pressure, low self-esteem to much more serious challenges such as abuse.

 

Traditionally, society has chosen to be reactionary in its approach to mental health. This social communication model, teaches children and adults alike how to speak up about what they are experiencing in daily conversation, instead of bottling it up and not knowing how to talk about their experiences. It also teaches people living in a community a language that they can use, that is specific to their needs and wants, so that everyone can have an opportunity to feel heard and understood.

 

What is SEMPI?

For the past three years, I have been writing The SEMPI Social Communication Model to cover all of the points that I have mentioned.

 

This model covers all aspects of mental and physical daily health in an easy to learn and use system. It teaches the person a sequence task that is easily learnt.

 

The SEMPI model will give people the ground skills, words and confidence to talk about their daily experiences in general conversation. ‘SEMPI’ is a new and easy mental health language that teaches everyone how to use ‘mindful communication,’ to speak openly without stigma about their own mental health and how their emotions and thoughts are affecting them.

 

It is also a stop gap measure for people who cannot access specialist support services for a range of reasons, which may include personal ones.

 

We really need your support so that we can teach people this simple model.

This model has been designed with an altruistic ‘pay it forward’ philosophy.

Once learnt, the model can then be passed on to the next person, or used reciprocally with the original sharer/teacher, or to a group, creating a situation where each person can benefit from the relationship and then pay it forward themselves. This creates an amazing ‘pay it forward’ SEMPI’ chain that seeps into the community at a grass roots level.

 

What will you get out of supporting our model?

 

You will be part of a movement that ignites a cascade of ‘paying it forward’

You will be helping to make life better for others through your willingness to do things that advantage them.

Practising altruism activates regions in your brain that release pleasure chemicals, making you feel great!

You will be helping to inject the world with love and empathy through the selfless act of giving your time to another human.

A warm and fuzzy feeling will stay with you after your kind act.

 

What will your support do?

 

By supporting us in this crowd funding campaign, you are helping us to train people to teach and use this model within their own communities.

Thank you for watching. With love and gratitude, Alyse

 

 

 

'SEMPI Social Communication Model' benefits for future generations

Posted on October 8, 2017 at 5:15 AM Comments comments (0)

‘SEMPI Social Communication Model’ Important benefits for future generations

Written by Alyse Price-Tobler, creator of www.sempi.net

The ‘SEMPI Social Communication Model’ will be free for anyone who would like to use it across the world. It is written for anyone aged from 3 until 110, no matter what your physical or mental state, occupation, intelligence or social ranking.

This particular piece is specifically about the benefits of the ‘SEMPI Social Communication Model’ on children of this day and age and the generations that are following.

The ‘SEMPI Social Communication Model’ teaches our kids a new way to speak about, understand and gain personal insight about how both their bodies and minds are feeling from an early age.

‘SEMPI’ is a new and easy mental health language that teaches children how to use ‘mindful communication’ to speak openly without stigma about their own mental health and how their emotions and thoughts are affecting them. This is highly important, as the skills learned from the ‘SEMPI Social Communication Model’ come together holistically to teach any child the language to express themselves to another person. I also call it a ‘mentally boosting, pay it forward model’. This allows the child to feel heard and understood, while improving the emotional intelligence. It allows children to teach and use the new language with each other, or an adult anytime. It is hoped that the empathy and listening levels within the children utilising this model will become heightened, and emotional intelligence and caring for each other will become the norm, making bullying outdated and a thing of the past.

This model has been created specifically to reduce the stigma of mental health problems and mental illness among children, so that as they grow up speaking about their inner thoughts and emotions will be a normal everyday occurrence! Hopefully, the shame and guilt that we as adults feel regarding our own mental health, personal limits and taking mental health days off will not exist in the next generation of children. We need to start thinking long term and learn to empower our children for the generations that are coming. The ‘SEMPI Social Communication Model’ covers all aspects of mental health in an easy to learn and use acronym. This allows the child to use the model in sequence until they feel comfortable and once mastered, they can choose which letter they feel is the most important for them. It may even be a combination of letters to express their emotions.

Previously children have been taught the skills to identify and implement precautions so that they won’t become physically sick, but as a society we have not taught children how to prevent becoming mentally sick. Nor have we taught them how to look after their beautiful minds. We all have mental health and are faced with challenges from early childhood which include bullying from family members, peer group pressure, low self-esteem to much more serious challenges such as sexual abuse, abuse, neglect, exposure to domestic violence and involvement in divorce. Traditionally, society has chosen to be reactionary in its approach to mental health and this is where the ‘SEMPI Social Communication Model’ comes in. This model teaches children how to speak up about what they are experiencing instead of bottling it up and not knowing how to talk about the pain. It also teaches children a language so that if anything happens to them that they wish to share, then they will have the ground skills, words and confidence to talk about their experiences in safety. Children also have the option to explore their pain, give it a voice and develop an understanding of how and why it is affecting them.

The ‘SEMPI Social Communication Model’ also promotes mindfulness as it offers the child time to turn within and reflect on how their body and mind are reacting to the outside stimulus, in that moment. I believe that if a child can learn the skills from this model, adopt them into everyday conversation and have it become a natural part of their daily lives, then they may not carry as much trauma from the event into their adult lives due to the event being dealt with immediately, giving the child and adults around them information and time to decide whether professional help needs to be instigated.

Can you imagine for one moment, being able to stop any negative thinking quickly, preventing any ‘cyclical maladaptive patterns’ from forming as a child? (Levenson, 1997). As a society, we would also be imbedding the great importance of mental self-care into our precious youth. It needs to be a priority that we instil the importance of physical illness preventions equally as much as a new mental health language, where children listen to their minds, learn the ‘SEMPI’ language and use their voices in order to feel relief and be heard and understood. In many cases, it may also relieve loneliness.

We need to invest in this model for all of the future generations so that they don’t have to suffer like we have. Thank you for reading. With love and gratitude, Alyse :)


 


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